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By algenuity 27 Sep, 2017
Algae Industry Magazine posted an article titled, "Algenuity takes quality control testing to the next level" yesterday Tuesday 26th September 2017.  

The article highlights the rigorous quality control testing process for the Algem labscale photobioreactor and Algenuity's commitment to precision lighting and temperature control for highly accurate and reproducible data.

The article can be found at  http://www.algaeindustrymagazine.com/algenuitys-algem-photobioreactor-system/
By algenuity 25 Sep, 2017
Welcome to the September edition of our quarterly Algenuity newsletter!

We hope this newsletter will help you make the most of your Algem labscale photobioreactor, keep you updated on the latest Algenuity news and partnership opportunities, and also show you some interesting algal research examples from our lab and around the world.
By algenuity 19 Sep, 2017

Our Algenuity team contacted an Algem user, Victor Sanchez, a PhD student at UCL, to ask him about his experience with the Algem labscale photobioreactor.  Below is a short interview.


Where do you work?

 

In the Biochemical Engineering Department at University College London.

 

How long have you been an Algem User?

 

Algem user since September 2016. 10 months.

 

What species or samples do you work with?

 

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii .

 

What is briefly the aim of your research?

 

Characterising the effects growing under different wavelengths has on C. reinhardtii at the physiological, metabolic and genetic levels.

 

What do you use the Algem for?

 

Growing batch cultures at different wavelengths with pH control.

 

What do you like about the Algem?


  • Its reproducibility.
  • The ability of controlling pH in flask cultures.
  • The ability to take samples maintaining axenic conditions without disturbing culture conditions.
  • The tight specs of the lights.

Did you use any other growing systems before the Algem and how did they compare?

 

To grow cells under different wavelengths I “engineered” my own light panel with RGBW LED strips. However the light distribution was not uniform (presumably my lack of electrical engineering skills did not help either). Therefore, performing experiments in triplicate and getting robust and consistent results was very hard. The Algem allows a standardisation and a high degree of control over culture conditions, which translates to high reproducibility of results.


Is there one thing you would recommend other Algem users to try?


The aseptic sampling with the three-way valve makes life so much easier. Especially if like me, the nearest safety cabinet to your Algem is relatively far away.

 

Learn more about the ascetic sampling technique in our application note: https://www.algenuity.com/algem-aseptic-real-time-sampling-protocol . Email info@algenuity.com for more information.

By algenuity 20 Jun, 2017
Welcome to our first Algenuity newsletter!  We hope this newsletter will help you make the most of your Algem labscale photobioreactor, keep you updated on the latest Algenuity news and partnership opportunities, and also show you some interesting algal research examples from our lab and around the world.
By algenuity 10 May, 2017

Arthrospira platensis (commonly referred to as Spirulina , despite belonging to a morphologically distinct genus) is a filamentous cyanobacterium characterised by its beneficial nutritional content, left handed open helical form, and ability to grow under highly alkaline conditions. A. platensis is protein rich and has been utilised as a traditional foodstuff in multiple cultures, most notably in Central America and in the region surrounding Lake Chad. Recently A. platensis has experienced a resurgence as a health food and a source of the blue pigment phycocyanin for use as a food colourant.

By algenuity 10 May, 2017

Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 is a unicellular freshwater cyanobacterium commonly employed as a cyanobacterial model system. It is capable of both photo- and heterotrophic growth making it useful for studying photosynthetic processes, and has a well defined circadian clock. Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 is naturally competent allowing direct uptake of recombinant DNA, and has a well defined molecular toolbox including a sequenced genome. There has also been interest in the use of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 for biofuel applications, both in itself and as a model for other third generation biofuel platforms.

By algenuity 08 Mar, 2017
Dr. Sarah D'Adamo, a Senior Algal Research Scientist at Algenuity, today won the 2nd place poster prize at the "Synthetic Biology for Natural Products" conference that was held this week from the 5th to 8th March 2017 in Cancun, Mexico.

Sarah's poster is titled, "Engineering the unicellular brown algae Phaedactylum tricornutum for high-value triterpenoid sapogenin production".

This Algenuity research comes from a 48 month European Union-funded FP7 grant called TriForC that began in October 2013 and ends this year in October 2017.  TriForC is an acronym for "a pipeline for the discovery, sustainable production and commercial utilisation of known and novel high-value triterpenes with new or superior biological activities". 

Other consortium partners of TriForC include University of Copenhagen (Denmark), Alkion Biopharma SAS (France), Vivacell Biotechnology España SL (Spain), Stockton Israel Ltd. (Israel), Extrasyntheses SAS (France), VIB (Belgium), John Innes Centre (United Kingdom), Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel), Universita Degli Studi del Piemonte Orientale Amedeo Avogradro (Italy), and University of Thessaly (Greece).

More information on the TriForC grant can be found at the website:  http://triforc.eu/

More information on the"Synthetic Biology for Natural Products" conference can be found at the website: https://www.fusion-conferences.com/conference58.php

By algenuity 13 Dec, 2016
Algenuity is proud to be speaking and exhibiting at the AlgaEurope conference in Madrid, Spain.  The conference began today Tuesday 13th December 2016 and runs until Thursday 15th December 2016.

Dr. Andrew Spicer, Algenuity CEO,will be speaking in the third session today at 2:10pm.  His talk is titled, "Surf and turf: transferring triterpenoid plant-metabolic pathways to micro-algal hosts and their growth optimisation".

The talk is part of the third session that is titled, "Genetically improved and GMO algae for high value products and commodities".  The session is chaired by Professor Sammy Boussiba of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, and the session includes talks from Professor Herminia Rodríguez of University of Seville, Professor Saul Purton of University College London , and Dr. Maria Huete-Ortega of University of Sheffield .  More information on the conference program can be found here: http://algaecongress.com/2016-conference-program/

Algenuity are also exhibiting their innovative Algem labscale photobioreactor.   The team are growing Chlorella sorokiniana are running a simple experiment over the three days.  Be sure to stop by and check out how the algae are growing!

More information about AlgaEurope can be found here: http://algaecongress.com/
By algenuity 09 Dec, 2016
On Saturday 26th November 2016, Algenuity-funded Dr. Stephen Rowden successfully graduated from the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Cambridge.  Stephen was part of the lab of Professor Chris Howe .

Stephen's thesis title is, "The interface between electrochemistry and genetics: wiring into photosynthetic gene expression".  This aligns with Algenuity's interest in developing tools and modular parts for algal synthetic biology.

Stephen's Ph.D. was part of the Industrial CASE studentship through the UK's Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).   Algenuity began funding Stephen's Ph.D. in 2012.  This is part of Algenuity's deep commitment to investing in the next generation of algal molecular biologists.

Algenuity has continued with this commitment, and in January 2016, Algenuity began funding the Ph.D. of Patrick Hickland, a former Algenuity intern, who is in the lab of Professor Alison Smith in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of Cambridge.
By algenuity 12 Sep, 2016
Sampling algal cultures for transcriptomics, proteomics, and enzymatic assays needs to be done quickly and without changing the culturing environment. One common sampling approach is to pause the Algem®, open the Algem® reactor lids, take the Algem® flasks to a laminar flow hood, take the samples, return the flasks to the Algem® reactors, and then resume the Algem® experiment. In most cases, this is a suitable sampling approach.

However, one problem with this sampling approach is that the Algem® flask leaves the controlled light and temperature environment of the Algem® reactor and is temporarily exposed to different conditions. Illumination periods of seconds have been demonstrated to have an effect on gene expression (Huysman 2013). In addition, the sampling approach is somewhat time intensive and limits the possibility of sampling every minute or in smaller unit time series.

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By algenuity 27 Sep, 2017
Algae Industry Magazine posted an article titled, "Algenuity takes quality control testing to the next level" yesterday Tuesday 26th September 2017.  

The article highlights the rigorous quality control testing process for the Algem labscale photobioreactor and Algenuity's commitment to precision lighting and temperature control for highly accurate and reproducible data.

The article can be found at  http://www.algaeindustrymagazine.com/algenuitys-algem-photobioreactor-system/
By algenuity 25 Sep, 2017
Welcome to the September edition of our quarterly Algenuity newsletter!

We hope this newsletter will help you make the most of your Algem labscale photobioreactor, keep you updated on the latest Algenuity news and partnership opportunities, and also show you some interesting algal research examples from our lab and around the world.
By algenuity 19 Sep, 2017

Our Algenuity team contacted an Algem user, Victor Sanchez, a PhD student at UCL, to ask him about his experience with the Algem labscale photobioreactor.  Below is a short interview.


Where do you work?

 

In the Biochemical Engineering Department at University College London.

 

How long have you been an Algem User?

 

Algem user since September 2016. 10 months.

 

What species or samples do you work with?

 

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii .

 

What is briefly the aim of your research?

 

Characterising the effects growing under different wavelengths has on C. reinhardtii at the physiological, metabolic and genetic levels.

 

What do you use the Algem for?

 

Growing batch cultures at different wavelengths with pH control.

 

What do you like about the Algem?


  • Its reproducibility.
  • The ability of controlling pH in flask cultures.
  • The ability to take samples maintaining axenic conditions without disturbing culture conditions.
  • The tight specs of the lights.

Did you use any other growing systems before the Algem and how did they compare?

 

To grow cells under different wavelengths I “engineered” my own light panel with RGBW LED strips. However the light distribution was not uniform (presumably my lack of electrical engineering skills did not help either). Therefore, performing experiments in triplicate and getting robust and consistent results was very hard. The Algem allows a standardisation and a high degree of control over culture conditions, which translates to high reproducibility of results.


Is there one thing you would recommend other Algem users to try?


The aseptic sampling with the three-way valve makes life so much easier. Especially if like me, the nearest safety cabinet to your Algem is relatively far away.

 

Learn more about the ascetic sampling technique in our application note: https://www.algenuity.com/algem-aseptic-real-time-sampling-protocol . Email info@algenuity.com for more information.

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